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20130124
20130201
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> our second story "outfront", a dire warning. this from britain's chief medical officer. the threat from drug-resistant bacteria is so serious that it could trigger a national emergency, similar to a terrorist attack. some pretty stunning words and it sure caught my attention, and "outfront" tonight, we're lucky to have dr. oz, host of "the dr. oz show." i've always wondered, people who go to the doctor every time they get sick and get antibiotics, are they causing a problem? are we going to have all these things be resistant to antibiotics? is she exaggerating? >> she's not exaggerating. i'm very concerned about this. the real question is what can we do about it? the reality is, we can't keep up with the bacteria. they're going to change much more rapidly than we develop new medications at the current pace, as we ta
to replicate those kinds of environments and behaviors, you have to give them space, you have to give them opportunities, and you have to give them an opportunity to have a lot of social partners. >> reporter: chimpanzees have been used in the u.s. labs since the 1920s. they've been important for the development of vaccines and understanding diseases including hepatitis and aids. but advances in computer and lab technologies make large numbers of chimps unnecessary. just 50 could be kept for the possibility of new research. you have a lot of feelings for chimpanzeeings right? >> mm-hmm. >> what >> reporter: what do you want them to have? >> i want them to have the freedom of choice and i thank's something we can give the chimps. >> reporter: the next issue would be the cost. it would cost millions more to care for all the chimps, but linda brent figures it's a debt they are owed. anna werner, cbs news, keithville, louisiana. and less saturated fat? it's eb. eggland's best eggs. better taste. better nutrition. better eggs. it's eb. maybe you can be there; maybe you can
're in an environment of you know, in the dirt, fighting an enemy, passions, that's another complicated factor there? >> let me stop you there, now that we -- we've had gays serving in the military sometime don't ask, don't tell. that's been reversed, but you know, and matt may have been having feelings for mike for a long time in the fox hole and the military has been doing okay. if you introduce women in there and you know, straight men start to have romantic feelings for female, you know, platoon mates or vice versa how does it change anything. >> that may well be the case, but there are a lot more matts having feelings for mary. and where those feelings are amplyfied or complicates the situation that-- >> let me jump in. you're trained, you're professionals, you're not monkeys, you may have the feelings, but you may control the feelings. >> when your r-you've been out in the field for 30 days without a shower and going to the bathroom in front of the guy in front of you. >> megyn: i'm thinking that mary doesn't look so good. >> that's ease toy say from the air conditioned studio here and new yor
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
there aren't frontlines, and there are urban environments. she lived with other american soldiers. she lived in this same very dirty room that smelled of feet almost all the time. they got along very well. i can imagine if you multiply that throughout what they call theater of battle and you have women in these tiny frontline outposts across the country that it would be a major adjustment. they will be logistical things that they'll have to adjust to. not just latrines, but they'll have to have more sensitivity training because these outposts are very macho, very aggress he have kinds of places. it will be a big adjustments. >> but it's an adjustment that the women all welcome. there is a lot of support for this on capitol hill from both republicans and democrats because they all have constituents, and they all see that these women are blocked. they're barred from promotions, and they're suffering all of the trevail of combat or being in a war zone without having the benefits. >> and without having certain, as you say, career advancement. there is some pay implications as well. what i just w
that in some cases led to that environment. >> goldie, do you agree with that? >> absolutely have to agree with that. you know, the proliferation of military rapes, assaults on women, willed soldiers, women marines, women sailors are more likely to be sexual assaulted by their own brethren than they are the enemy. that's the plain fact of the matter and many of those cases are covered up. those women are sent home and those money are dent to duty station to duty station and their careers move on. it's been a long time since a woman joined the military. women have been fighting this good fight a very, very long time. there are relatives of mine, cousins and brothers, who are retired navy officers. they are retired air force. they served in the naef. i'm the only marine in the family. i think that says something about my mindset on this thing. my brother said that i was crazy. he's probably right about that. >> oh, you're not crazy, goldie. you're not crazy. >> i think it takes -- but i think that the criteria for me and the criteria for every woman and man who serves ought to be the same, a
the cultural environment of the infantry based on how women have been treated so far? >> you know, i have to have some strand of faith that our leadership knows how to take this initiative forward. should women be punished or said they can't be a part of our military in certain ways just because the men would be unruly or take advantage of the women? sexual assault is a problem in our military. hands down. men are assaulted just as well as women. so it's a problem that we need to take care of universally, militarywise. >> captain vernice "flygirl" armour. i just figured out flygirl is your nickname, right? >> it is. it is. >> all right. i just want to make sure that i had that correctly. captain, we really appreciate your time and insights on this really important issue. thank you. >> i appreciate that. and with women's history month and black history month coming up, it's very timely. >> thank you again. >>> moments from now, anti-abortion advocates will gather in d.c. for the march on life. house speaker john boehner, former presidential candidate rick santorum are among those who will
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
is a safety threat and it has environment concerns. the project was approved last month. so far the city is not responding to that lawsuit. >>> it's just turning over to 8:21. when it comes to the super bowl, you can bet on anything from beyonce's hair to players ending up in jail. a rundown of the more outrageous super bowl bets. >>> look outside, check out our weather. this is how we look outside, meteorologist mark tamayo will tell us about the warmer weather ahead as we get ready for super bowl sunday. >> good morning. traffic on 280 northbound. that looks pretty good getting up to highway 17. we'll tell you more about the trouble spots in the bay area. ao >>> 8:24. the city of new orleans is using the super bowl to show that it's recovering from hurricane katrina. thousands of reporters attended a super bowl media party last night. the gala included live music and performers on stilts. it was staged in a warehouse where mardi gras float floats are built. >> wonderful. the tourism and -- it just puts on a happy face for everybody. we're back, good to go, come visit us. wonderful. >>
, in a professional environment, they've got to think about themselves like a professional. and the other is don't worry about the paycheck. yes, my book is called all work, no pay, it's a joke, but if you're an unpaid intern you should only be working 12 to 15 hours per week at a structured, structured, safe environment, but if it's -- if you're choosing between a paid opportunity, and an unpaid opportunity, it's not about the paycheck, it's about the experience. which is going to be more beneficial for you and help you after you graduate. >> tucker: smart advice. >> ainsley: and a tip he she was clayton's intern at one time. see you're doing well. >> thank you. >> ainsley: and farmers selling products without a permit, but they are not going down without a fight. we'll explain. great segment. [ female announcer ] your smile. like other precious things that start off white, it yellows over time. fact is, when it comes to your smile, if you're not whitening, you're yellowing. crest 3d white whitestrips go below the enamel surface to whiten as well as $500 professional treatments, at a fraction o
more. you want to dress in layers and dress properly for the environment. >> is there a big difference in terms of elderly and young people in ways that tech really get sick and -- they can really get sick and suffer illness? >> definitely. older people have a decreased cold tolerance. they don't sense the cold as quickly as younger people do. plus they have other health concerns as well that affect their ability to be warm and to remain warm in cold climates. they also take a lot of medications which can decrease their ability to stay warm, so they're definitely a high risk category as well as infants. infants really can't tell you when they're cold, and they have a decreased ability to tolerate cold, cold temperatures, so it's important to check on both of those extremes. >> i know you brought some props in to show us what we can do to protect ourselves. >> i did. grandma already taught us this, but maintaining a good diet and staying healthy includes lots of fruits and vegetables. you need to drink a lot of water as well, and people say, oh, why do i need to drink water? your skin g
in a high stressed sporting event environment. it's held every two years in lee own, france and is named for the famed french chefl paul bow kus. each competitor from each country has 5 1/2 hours to present one meat dish and one fresh fish from scratch. >> it's food that even foodies might find a little frue-frue. it's over the top. >> over the top is really the way to put it. you're really try dog food that will wow the spectator, wow the chefs visually technically, and also whenever it hits their mouth. >> reporter: the europeans dominate the competition. the best an american has ever done is come in sixth. richard and corey are expected to change that. this $150,000 kitchen in the bunker at the greenbriar is the exact replica of the one they will use in france. >> we actually took chalk and chalked out on the floor basically exactly where everything was going to be. >> they've piped in actual crowd noise from past competitions. their war room complete with a countdown clock is where they plot their practice sessions and review photos of past winning platters.
is have the person go over their memory as if it was happening again but they are in a safe environment. >> they say it looks like a video game but when you put the goggles on, it brings you to the same scenario. >> you put on the sounds, the sound of wind. >> and we can blow stuff up. >> therapy has been effective. i was never a fan of prolonged exposure and that kind of thing because it's an uncomfortable thing. >> at its core, therapy has to induce some level of anxiety so that you're processing hard memories. i'm skip, clinical psychologist at the university of california institute for creative technologies. let's go. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new cadillac xts... another big night on the town, eh? ...and the return of life lived large. ♪ humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total
and a resource officers, and promoting and supporting in nurturing school environment, not one that is punitive. we must stop suspending kids out of school. we rarely saw kids get suspended. we rarely saw a kid get expelled and now it is a common phenomenon. we need to keep our arms around these kids so they are in our communities. thank you for the opportunity to testify. i may have to leave a little early to catch a flight back, but thank you for having me. >> ms. campbell. >> thank you for inviting me to speak at today's hearing. i'm proud to work for the national council for behavioral health, a national membership organization representing more than 2000 organizations that provide mental health and addiction treatment in almost every community. they provide services to more than 8 million children, adults, and family. today, a one to cover three. -- existing federal reporting law, the ongoing need for improved treatment among veterans, and the need for better public education about the nature of mental health and addiction. our members and board come from every corner of the country and ha
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)